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Words, communication

| 2017-08-03
(Chinese Social Sciences Today)

八字还没一撇
Not even the first stroke of the character is in sight.
This proverb is used in a similar context to “Don’t count your chickens before they are hatched.”

 

言传身教。
Teach by words; influence by deeds.
This saying encourages people to set examples for others through practice.

 

诗三百, 一言以蔽之, 曰:「思无邪」。
The 300 verses of the Book of Odes can be summed up in a single phrase: ‘Don’t think in an evil way’.
This phrase also comes from The Analects of Confucius.

 

成事不说, 遂事不谏, 既往不咎。
Don’t bother explaining that which has already been done; don’t bother criticizing that which is already gone; don’t bother blaming that which has already passed.
This phrase also comes from The Analects of Confucius.

 

有德者,必有言,有言者,不必有德。
People with virtue must speak out; people who speak are not all virtuous.
This phrase comes from The Analects of Confucius. According to Confucianism, the moral character of a writer determines the value of his work. Virtuous people naturally write well, but those who write well might not necessarily be virtuous.

 

君子敏于行而讷于言。 
The gentlemen are speedy as a worker and cautious as a speaker.
This phrase also comes from The Analects of Confucius.

 

言顾行,行顾言 
When a man speaks, he should think of his acts; when he acts, he should think of what he said.
This phrase comes from The Book of Rites, indicating that a man’s words should correspond to his actions and vice versa.